The Tourist

Reporter at the Nelson Mail, New Zealand. Among other things.

Why, ultimately, does experience argue almost always in favour of publication? Because a secret once lost by government, even if important, cannot be “returned”. It can fly across the globe in an instant and even if momentarily suppressed, it must inform all those who have learned it as they in turn inform others. Even more persuasive is the reality that neither officials nor journalists can ever be sure of the consequences of publication: facts once distributed, like seeds in a garden, acquire a life of their own with consequences that can be salutary, malignant, both, or neither. So while intelligence agents perceive a professional duty to cloak all their deeds and knowledge, it is a newspaper’s duty to publish what it learns without presuming to predict a good or ill result. The tension thus created is probably the only tolerable way to proceed.

transhumanisticpanspermia:

i like how “hte” has become popular simply by nature of being a misspelling of “the” that isn’t “teh”

there was a need and the need was fulfilled

now what happens when “hte” becomes associated with outdated meme culture

there’s only so many possibilities

het, eth, and eht will be the only 3 remaining

this is not a sustainable resource

(via shammyninja)